Previously "Diary of a Birding Medic"

Wednesday, 17 September 2014

Red Necked Grebe - Daventry Country Park - 17th September 2017


It was good to touch base with the Red Necked Grebe at Daventry Country Park. The light was rather challenging, but the Grebe favoured the dam and at times came within ten feet.











Daventry Country Park - Grey Wagtail - 17th September 2014


Who can resist such a gorgeous bird? One of two feeding along the dam at Daventry Country Park.






Dull, Drab, Dreary, Dark and Disappointing Daventry Country Park!

It must be several months since I ventured out to Daventry Country Park, one of my favourite waters, so I decided that this would be my destination for a few hours this morning. The title of this post sums up the light this morning which was disappointing! The most disappointing part was the noise from a new housing development only yards below the dam. Obviously governments, councils, developers and greedy land owners cannot bare to see green fields and farm land. One day we will run out of food and the cry will be "why can't we grow our own ?" You cannot eat bricks and concrete!







Some good news in the form of some new scrapes and settling pools! Should hopefully be good for waders!


The birds were good though!

Red Necked Grebe; Willow Tit; Common Sandpiper; Grey Wagtail; Greenshank; plus of course, the expected species.

And this afternoon..................................the sun shone in a blue sky!

Sunday, 14 September 2014

North Norfolk - Red Backed Shrike - 9th - 12th September 2014


At last - a life tick in the form of a red Backed Shrike (albeit 1st winter)! This confiding bird had taken up temporary residence in Blakeney.









North Norfolk - Little Stint - 9th - 12th September 2014


They may be small but they are fantastic waders! Little Stint, smaller than a Dunlin, full of character and extremely energetic. They cannot fail to be a favourite!














North Norfolk - Larger Waders - 9th - 12th September 2014


Spoonbill

Another mixed bag of the larger waders encountered.

Spoonbill



Curlew









Little Egret




Greenshank